L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

17 Maintaining Access Manager Sessions

An Access Manager session is created during authentication and bound to both the user and the client with which the user has authenticated. Access Manager sessions are maintained to provide tracking and policy enforcement (performed either manually by an Administrator or using automated flows) for a given session's lifecycle. The Access Manager session lifecycle consists of state transitions for session creation, updates, idleness, and expiration.

This chapter describes concepts and procedures for Access Manager sessions.

17.1 Introducing Access Manager Session Management

With this 11gR2 PS2 release of Oracle Access Management, Access Manager sessions can be managed from either the server side or the client side.

  • Server-side session management (also referred to as Coherence-based session management) is the default session management option developed for Access Manager. It allows for advanced session management across nodes via Coherence-based caching. Offering reliable performance and advanced features (including impersonation, session sniping, identity context propagation and the like), server side session management is recommended for most deployments - especially internal ones where rich session management features are desired. More details are documented in:

  • Client-side session management (also referred to as cookie-based session management) manages sessions using browser cookies; it is essentially stateless. Client side session management offers higher performance with a lightweight footprint when compared to the Coherence-based option. It stores session details in the browser cookie with no information saved on the server-side and is most appropriate for very large deployments where advanced server-side session management features are not needed. More details are documented in "Understanding Client-Side Session Management".

    Note:

    Cookie-based sessions can be accessed only from a browser request context and not directly from the server.

See "Using WLST To Configure Session Management" for instructions on how to configure the session management option.

17.2 Understanding Server-Side Session Management

This section provides the following topics:

17.2.1 Securing Access Manager Sessions

Session security begins with a secure installation. For installation details see the Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access Management.

The HTTPS protocol, Oracle Coherence and database encryption are some of the ways in which Access Manager supports server-side session security. The following list describes how this support can work.

  • HTTPS Protocol

    Access Manager helps prevent session fixation by providing IP address checks by the Proxy. To further help prevent session fixation, be sure to use the secure HTTPS protocol for communication between WebGates and OAM Servers.

  • Oracle Coherence

    Data is not encrypted in-memory; however, data is protected over the wire. Oracle Coherence communicates between the different Access Manager instances on various servers, and this communication is secured in the following ways.

    • Coherence supports communication only between hosts that have been previously identified. This is done as a range of IP addresses, or by specific host names. Access Manager configuration files contain entries for each server that participates in the communication. During startup, this information is provided to Coherence ensuring that only authorized servers participate in the communication.

    • Coherence uses mutually-authenticated SSL between all servers in the cluster. The jceks keystore file, which holds the applicable keys and certificates, is created during installation.

    For more information, see "Access Manager Sessions and the Role of Oracle Coherence" as well as the Oracle Coherence documentation.

  • Database Encryption

    The Session Management Engine does not encrypt data. For security concerns, use an in-database encryption such as Oracle Advanced Security.

17.2.2 Understanding the Access Manager Session Lifecycle, States, and Enforcement

The session lifecycle refers to a set of states with defined transitions from one state to another that depend on user activity (or lack thereof), and manual (or automated) Administrator activity. Administrators can define the following global session lifecycle settings:

  • Session Lifetime

  • Idle Timeout

  • Maximum number of Sessions

  • Database Persistence of Active Sessions

Note:

Idle Timeout can also be implemented as application-specific settings, as described later.

Session lifecycle states include those in Table 17-1.

Table 17-1 Session Lifecycle States

StateDescription

Active

Newly-created sessions are active. A session is created when the user is authenticated by Access Manager.

The session remains active until Access Manager determines that the session must transition into one of the other states in this table.

Note: Administrators can delete only active sessions.

Idle

An active session becomes idle when the user does not access Access Manager-protected content for the period defined by an Administrator.

When an active session becomes idle, the user must re-authenticate to proceed. When re-authentication is successful, the session returns to the Active state; session attribute values are preserved through this process.

Expired

An active session expires when the duration of the session exceeds the defined lifetime. An expired session is completely inaccessible and eligible for deletion. When an active session expires, the user must re-authenticate to proceed.

When re-authentication is successful, a new session is created; however, session attribute values are not preserved (as they are for Idle states).


For more information, see the following topics:

17.2.2.1 About Global Session Enforcement Checks

Each Access Manager session holds the following attributes and applicable values.

  • Session creation time

  • Last access time

The values of these attributes are compared for session enforcement as described in Table 17-2.

Table 17-2 Session Checks for State Changes

Session CheckDescription

Is the Session Idle?

Compares the last access time against the configured Idle Timeout value. Exceeding the configured period triggers a change from the Active to the Idle state.

Is the Session Expired?

Compares the session creation time against the configured Session Lifetime. Exceeding the configured period triggers a change from the Active to the Expired state.


During transitions to the Idle state, underlying session attributes are preserved because the user previously satisfied authentication criteria and the data is trusted. However, continued access to protected resources based on that session, and resulting modification of data within that session, is not allowed until the user re-authenticates, proving not to be a malicious user with access to an unlocked computer.

17.2.2.2 About Session Removal

A session can be removed by any of the actions described in Table 17-3.

Table 17-3 Session Removal

ActionDescription

Expiration

Expired sessions are eligible for removal based on their creation time. Actual removal is determined by the storage mechanism. The session is removed from the distributed cache using a background task running on the server; it is removed from the database using a similar background task, an optionally-enabled job within the database itself, or both methods in combination.

Once a session has been deleted from storage on all tiers (local and distributed caches, and from the database if enabled), the session is removed.

User Logout

User Logout triggers immediate removal from the distributed cache, subject to present volume of DB session writes and performance.

Termination

Termination is identical to user log out whether the session is interactively terminated through the Administration Console or in an automated way--as part of an Oracle Identity Management user lockout or de-provisioning flow.


17.2.2.3 About Step-Up and Step-Down Authentication and Credentials

On occasion, multiple forms of authentication are required and performed within a single session to complete a step-up flow. In a step-up flow, a user authenticates to access protected content and later in the same session, the user requests other, more sensitive content and is required to authenticate again to access it at a more stringent level. In a step-up flow, multiple authentications always occur in order of the increasing authentication level. Each session holds the Authentication Level attribute for step-up authentication enforcement.

A re-authentication level might be a step down from the session. If the re-Authentication Level is less than that previously contained in the session, the user has completed a step-down process. Upon successful re-authentication, the session is restored to the Active state with an Authentication Level that is equal to the lower level of the authentication scheme used. If the user later attempts to access content that is protected at a higher level, step-up authentication occurs.

17.2.2.4 About Optional Application-Specific Session Enforcement

Access Manager enforces limitations on user access to resources in a more granular way than is possible with a single set of global session timings, or single set of authentication schemes in which access depends solely on a single authentication level. Access to certain data has more stringent requirements, while access to all other data is configured globally.

Administrators can choose to override global session timeout settings on a per application basis, defined as part of Application Domain settings. Optional application-specific session configuration provides:

  • The ability to declare session idle timings on a per-application basis, which is generally more stringent than the global idle timing defined within the deployment as a whole.

  • The ability to require the user to re-authenticate after a per-application session inactivity timeout.

Table 17-4 describes session enforcement when you have defined Application Domain-specific overrides to global session settings.

Table 17-4 Application Domain-Specific Overrides

OverrideDescription

Is the Session Idle?

Compares the last access time against the configured Idle Timeout value for the defined Application Domain only. Exceeding the configured period triggers a change from the Active to the Idle state.

Is the Session Expired?

Compares the session creation time against the configured Session Lifetime. Exceeding the configured period triggers a change from the Active to the Expired state for the defined Application Domain group only.


17.2.2.5 About Timeout with Multiple-Agent Types: OSSO and OAM Agents

The idle timeout is applied appropriately even if the session is operating in a disconnected state. (A disconnected state occurs if mod_osso requests are being made but not by the WebGate. In this case, the session appears to have idled out to the server.) To enable global logout for the OSSO Agent, the Session Management Engine reconciles a period of inactivity with the OAM Agent against a period of activity with the OSSO Agent.

mod_osso agents support granular timeout only if the Global Inactivity TimeOut feature is enabled (using the WLST command). The GITO cookie is needed in special cases to support timeout with multiple types of agents (mod_osso and WebGate) working with OAM Server. If a user leaves an active session (with an OAM Agent), starts a session with an OSSO Agent, and then returns to the initial session (with the OAM Agent, now inactive), the Session Management Engine reconciles the period of inactivity with the OAM Agent against the period of activity with the OSSO Agent to enable global logout for the OSSO Agent.

17.2.2.6 About OpenSSO Agents

In the context of session management, OpenSSO agents are equivalent to WebGates. Unlike mod_osso, OpenSSO Agents do not operate in a disconnected state.

17.2.3 Access Manager Sessions and the Role of Oracle Coherence

This section describes how the embedded Oracle Coherence data management and caching service interacts with the session stores during session management. This might include the local and distributed (serialized) in-memory caches and an optional database if one is configured and enabled as the Session Management Engine session store.

Note:

Generally, both the AdminServer and OAM Servers participate in the Oracle Coherence cluster. However, AdminServer does not access session data except when performing searches.

Access Manager uses Coherence to replicate session states within a distributed installation. Coherence is used to communicate state changes between the OAM Servers. Coherence relies on User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for cluster discovery and heartbeat. If a firewall exists between certain components, then the corresponding UDP ports used by Coherence must be open. Otherwise, Access Manager might not work correctly.

Note:

To maintain a consistent shared session state among the OAM Servers, the Coherence infrastructure requires network connectivity between cluster members. Oracle recommends the use of redundant networking infrastructure in deployments requiring OAM session data consistency in the presence of network component failures.

Oracle Coherence replicates and distributes session data across all Managed Servers in the cluster. The location of the session is transparent to the client. The Session Management Engine exposes session objects to other components as needed.

Note:

Oracle Coherence traffic is automatically encrypted.

Oracle Coherence also performs failover and reconciliation. For example, if one Managed Server fails, Oracle Coherence automatically distributes data from the failed host to the distributed in-memory caches of other Managed Servers.

Although the Oracle Access Management Console resides on the WebLogic AdminServer, sessions are not stored there. Figure 17-1 illustrates session storage using an embedded Oracle Coherence.

The session is stored on two hosts. If the distributed cache runs out of allocated memory space, the oldest sessions are evicted from the cache. If the Session Management Engine is configured to use just the distributed cache, evicted sessions are recorded in a flat file to avoid loss. The following list is an overview of how session data is stored after a successful authentication.

  1. The session is created in the distributed in-memory cache. A copy is available in the local in-memory cache on the computer hosting the resource (Managed Server 1 in this example). If session persistence to database is enabled, the session is also written to the database.

  2. With each session change, Oracle Coherence updates, replicates, and distributes the session in the distributed cache among OAM Servers (Managed Server 2 in this example). By default, each change is also written to the database.

  3. A new resource request is made and the session is read into the local in-memory cache on the server hosting the resource (Managed Server 3 in this example).

17.3 Server-Side Session Enforcement Examples

Satisfying the authentication scheme of a given level provides access to all resources protected at lower levels. Additionally, all authentication schemes of a given level are viewed as equivalent. This section provides a simple session enforcement example based on a single authentication scheme used in two application domains as well as a more complex example based on multiple authentication schemes used in two application domains.

17.3.1 Example 1: Single Authentication Scheme

Consider the following configuration:

  • A single authentication scheme (S1) defined using Level 2

  • Application domains D1 and D2

  • All resources within each domain are protected with a single authentication policy, which uses S1, and a single authorization policy.

  • Global Session Configuration:

    • Session Lifetime: 90 minutes

    • Idle Session Timeout: 0 (session never idles out)

    • Application Domain Timeout: 30 minutes

Now consider the outcomes in Table 17-5.

Table 17-5 Session Content: Single Authentication Scheme

Time (Delta)ActionAccess Allowed or DeniedSession Content

0

Access to D1

Denied due to no session

null

1

Authentication with S1 and Access to D1

Allowed because Authentication scheme is satisfied

Level 2, authentication time 1

21

Access to D2

Allowed

Level 2, authentication time 1

66

Access to D1

Denied due to Application Domain Timeout (based on the parameters configured)

Level 2, authentication time 1

67

Authentication with S1 and Access to D1 and D2

Both Allowed because the Authentication Sceme is satisfied

Level 2, authentication time 67


17.3.2 Example 2: Multiple Authentication Schemes

In previous releases of Access Manager, a session could only have its authentication level reduced in the context of an Oracle Identity Management integration self-service flow (such as forced password reset). In this release, step-down authentication occurs when a session times out as a matter of course--until the user happens to provide new credentials that satisfy a scheme of the same level as the maximum held by the session previously. Otherwise, from the authentication perspective, it is as if the session is new and further step-up is required. Consider this example with two authentication schemes (for step-up and step-down).

  • Authentication schemes S1 (Level 2) and S2 (Level 3)

  • Application domains D1 and D2

  • All resources within each domain are protected with a single authentication policy, and a single authorization policy

  • D1 uses S1; D2 uses S2

  • Global Session Configuration:

    • Session Life: 240 mins

    • Idle Timeout: 30 mins

    • Appdomain 2 (D2) Timeout: 15 mins (appdomain setting)

When accessing resources from D1, timeout will occur after 30 minutes (global timeout setting); D2 timeout will happen after 15 mins since its timeout value is overridden at the global level. Table 17-6 shows the resulting outcomes.

Table 17-6 Session Outcomes: Multiple Authentication Schemes

Time (Delta)ActionAccess Allowed or DeniedSession Content

0

Access D1 resource (RD1)

Access allowed after successful login

Timeout for D1 will be set to 0+30=30 (30 is default global timeout as D1 has not overriden timeout at the Application Domain level)

1 (implies after 1 minute)

Access D2 resource (RD2)

Access allowed post credential challenge (user will be prompted for credentials since D2 is protected using a higher authentication scheme)

Timeout of D2 will be set to 1+15=16

t>16 and t<30 (say t=20)

Access RD1 and RD2

Allowed access to RD1 because timeout of D1=30. Allowed access to RD2 after providing credentials since timeout of D2=16

The new timeout of D2 is 16

40

Access RD1

Allowed: D1 resource will be allowed since timeout is 50

 

55

Access RD1 and RD2

Allowed to access both resources after user is successfully challenged for credentials.

Timeout of D1 is now 85 (55+30)

Timeout of D2 is now 70 (55+15)


The access order does have an impact on the outcome. For instance, the last D1 access could have been allowed if the user had chosen to first pursue access to the D2 application after credentials had expired. For example:

  • Authentication S2 with Access to D2 Allowed: L3 scheme satisfied; resulting level of the now (again) active session same as before. Session Content: Level 3, authentication time 51

  • Access to D1 Allowed: Level 3 credentials also sufficient for Level 2-protected access. Session Content: Level 3, authentication time 51.

17.4 Configuring the Server-Side Session Lifecycle

Session Lifecycle settings can be defined using the Oracle Access Management Console. When you define either global or application-specific session lifecycle settings, any timing interval set to 0 cancels the corresponding check. For example if idle timeout is set to 0, sessions never idle out. With a session lifetime of 0, sessions never expire. In all cases, applicable data is tracked and updated in the session, just as if it is being checked on a per-request basis.

This section provides the following topics:

17.4.1 About Global Session Lifecycle Settings

Access Manager session lifecycle settings are defined as part of the Common Settings shared by all OAM Servers. Figure 17-2 shows the lifecycle attributes that you can configure on the Common Settings page.

Table 17-7 describes the global session lifecycle settings and their defaults. Sessions can operate in a disconnected mode (mod_osso, for example). Therefore, changes to the configuration establishing your session rules apply only to new sessions. To apply changes immediately, Oracle recommends that you terminate existing sessions and force users to create new ones that adhere to your new rules.

Table 17-7 Global Session Settings

SettingDescription

Session Lifetime (minutes)

The amount of time, in minutes, that a user's authentication session remains active. When the lifetime is reached, the session expires.

Default = 1440 minutes (24 hours specified in an integer representing minutes)

A value of zero (0) disables this setting. Any value between 0 (zero) and 2147483647 is allowed.

Note: An expired session is automatically deleted from the in-memory caches (or database).

Idle Timeout (minutes)

The amount of time, in minutes, that a user's authentication session remains active without accessing any Access Manager protected resources. When the user is idle for a longer period, they are asked to re-authenticate.

Default = 15 minutes

A value of zero (0) disables this setting. Any value between 0 (zero) and 2147483647 is allowed.

Note: Timed-out sessions are not deleted from the session manager. Session data could be removed from memory but will still be available in the persistant store (database). After re-authentication, the same session will be re-activated.

See Also: "About Application-Specific Session Overrides"

Maximum Number of Sessions per User

The exact number of sessions each user can have at one time. Use this setting to configure multiple session restrictions for all users.

Any positive integer is allowed.

Specifying the count as "1", activates a special mode. If a user who already has a session authenticates using another device (thereby creating a new session), then their existing session is deleted. No error is reported and no warning is given.

Note: Too high a number impacts performance and result in a security risk. Oracle recommends less than 20 as a reasonable limit per user. Otherwise there can be performance impact. For tuning information, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Performance and Tuning Guide.

Database Persistence for Active Sessions Enabled

Persists active sessions to the configured database session store, in addition to the local and distributed caches. Sessions are retained even if all managed servers die off.

Default = Enabled (checked)

If this is overkill for your environment, or you want to perform deployment sizing to take into account the database, you can clear the checkbox and restart all OAM Servers to disable this function.


17.4.2 About Application-Specific Session Overrides

Application-specific access is tracked from the initial application-access time and is updated only as further requests are made of that Application Domain. In other words, the user's authentication and the authentication state are under control of Access Manager and the Administrator. The current idle time for a given application is shared between Access Manager and the application. The application provisions its own run time data for the user on a per-session basis and needs to remove it as soon as possible to make room for others.

Administrators can add application-specific session overrides on the Summary tab of an Application Domain. Table 17-8 lists application-specific settings that, when specified, override global session settings.

Table 17-8 Application-Specific Session Timing Overrides

ElementDescription

Idle timeout

Access Manager previously stored the last access time value within the session. To enforce maximum idle time on a per-application basis, Access Manager includes a new application-specific last access time field to hold it. This is filled with the last access time for each subset of domains visited within the course of a session, on which a per-application idle timeout override has been defined. This is not needed for domains on which an override has not been defined--no checking is done against such data.

Default: undefined


For more information, see "Viewing or Modifying Optional Application-Specific Session Overrides".

17.4.3 Viewing or Modifying Global Session Settings

Users with valid Administrator credentials can use the following procedure to modify common session lifecycle settings using the Oracle Access Management Console.

To view or modify global session settings

  1. From the Oracle Access Management Console, click Common Settings.

  2. On the Common Settings page, expand the Session section.

  3. Click the arrow keys beside each list to increase or decrease session lifecycle settings as needed (Table 17-7):

    • Session Lifetime (minutes)

    • Idle Timeout (minutes)

    • Maximum Number of Sessions per User

    • (Management) Maximum Search Results - denotes the number of sessions fetched by default for a session query if the result set is large

    • Database Persistence of Active Sessions Enabled

  4. Check the box to enable Database Persistence for Active Sessions.

  5. Click Apply to submit the changes (or close the page without applying changes).

  6. Close the page when you finish.

  7. Proceed to one of the following topics:

17.4.4 Viewing or Modifying Optional Application-Specific Session Overrides

Users with valid Administrator credentials can use the following procedure to modify optional session settings for one or more application domains in a named group.

To view or modify optional application-specific session settings

  1. From the Oracle Access Management Console, click Application Domains.

  2. Find and open the desired domain.

  3. On the Summary tab, enter the following information to create (or add) this domain to the group that uses session overrides (Table 17-8):

  4. Click Apply to submit the changes (or close the page without applying changes).

  5. Proceed to "Managing Active Server-Side Sessions".

17.5 Managing Active Server-Side Sessions

The Oracle Access Management Console Session Management page provides Search controls that enable Administrators to create a query based on filter conditions, save their Search Criteria for use later, and add fields to the query form to further refine the search.

In the database store configuration, the session might exist in the database but not in the cache. Session searches are based on the system time stamp. The database is queried for sessions updated earlier than the time stamp (minus the write delay). The cache is queried for sessions updated later than this time stamp. Resulting data found in the cache and the database is merged. If duplicate results exist, cache data prevails. Detailed performance metrics are generated for search operations.

This section describes how to locate and delete one or more sessions for a single user, or for all users. It provides the following information:

17.5.1 About the Session Management Pages

Figure 17-3 illustrates the Session Management page, under the System Configuration tab, Common Configuration section. Additional details follow the figure.

Table 17-9 describes Session Management page and Search controls that enable you to create a query that is based on filter conditions.

Table 17-9 Session Management Controls and the Results Table

NameDescription

Delete All User Sessions ...

Choose this command button to delete the active sessions of all users.

Note: A Confirmation window appears where you can confirm or decline the operation.

Saved Search

Lists any search criteria saved previously for reuse. A list like the following is made available whenever you save search criteria.

If you choose Personalize, you can change the behavior of the saved search criteria by making new choices in the following window.

Match All Any

Enables you to match either any of the criteria you have specified or match all of the criteria you have specified during the search.

Note: When a resource is protected , it is not displayed in a session search.

Userid

Enter a specific userID in the field and then click the Search button to display all active sessions for this user. Incomplete strings and wild cards are allowed.

The following list is available to assist your search:

Client IP Address

Enter a Client IP Address and then click the Search button to display all active sessions for this user. Incomplete strings and wild cards are allowed. The same list is available to assist your Userid search and your Client IP Address.

Search

Click this button to initiate a search based on criteria in the form.

Reset

Click this button to clear the form of all criteria.

Save

Click this button to initiate a save operation that enables reuse of your search criteria. The following window opens.

  1. Enter a name, which will appear in the Saved Search list for later selection.

  2. Set this search as the Default (or clear the check box).

  3. Set this search to Run Automatically (or clear the check box).

  4. Save the Results Layout (or clear the check box).

  5. Click OK.

Add Fields

You can add different fields to your search form. The following list is available to assist.

  1. Click the Add Fields button.

  2. Click items in the list to add them to the form and click Save.

After adding an item, notice that a list is available to assist with the search. For example: Employment and time-based selections provide the following list.

View

Choose commands from the View menu above the results table to configure the table. Commands include:

  • Columns: Displays a menu with the following options you can use to hide or display specific details in the table:

  • Detach: Expands the results table to a full-screen view

  • Attach: Restores the Session Management page view.

  • Reorder Columns: Specifies a new order for columns containing session data in the results table.

Delete

Choose this command button after selecting items in the results table to delete.

Note: When session search criteria is generic (using just a wild card (*), for example), there is a limitation on deleting a session from a large list of sessions. Oracle recommends that your session search criteria is fine-grained enough to obtain a relatively small set of results (ideally 20 or less).

Also: A Confirmation window appears where you can confirm or decline the operation.

Detach

Click to expand the results table to a full-page view.

Note: If the table is already a detached full-page, click Detach to restore the Session Management page.

Results table (not named)

After searching for the active sessions of a specific user, results are displayed in the table. Details include:

  • Session ID: A unique, OAM-generated session Id.

  • User ID:

  • Impersonating:

  • Creation Time: The day and time the session was created.

  • Last Accessed: The day and time the session was last accessed

  • Client IP: The IP address of the specified user.

  • ID Store

  • Impersonator


17.5.2 Managing Active Sessions

Users with valid Administrator credentials can use information in the following procedure to configure the search results table, locate the active sessions of a specific user, delete one or more sessions for a specific user, or delete all sessions for all users.

When a resource is protected by , it is not displayed in a session search.

Skip any steps that do not apply to your requirements.

Prerequisites

OAM Server must be running.

To locate and manage active sessions

  1. From the Oracle Access Management Console, click Session Management.

    The Session Management Search page appears with the Username field and a results table.

  2. Add Fields: From the Add Fields list, choose the desired field name (Table 17-9).

  3. Choose Operators: Open the list of operators for the chosen search field, and choose the desired function.

  4. Find sessions:

    1. In the desired query field, enter your criteria (with or without a wild card (*)).

    2. Click the Search button to locate sessions that match either any or all your criteria.

    3. Review the results table.

    4. Repeat if needed to further refine your search.

  5. Configure the Results Table: Use functions on the View menu to create the desired results table.

  6. Delete sessions:

    1. In the results table, click one or more sessions to remove.

    2. Click the Delete (x) button to delete the selected sessions.

    3. Click Yes to confirm deleting selected sessions (or click No to cancel the delete operation).

    4. Notify the user, if needed.

  7. Delete sessions for all users:

    1. Click the Delete All Sessions button in the upper-right corner.

    2. Click Yes when you are asked to confirm.

  8. Close the Session Management page when you finish.

  9. Proceed to "Verifying Server-Side Session Operations".

17.6 Verifying Server-Side Session Operations

Use the following procedure to verify your configured session lifecycle operations.

To validate session operations

  1. Authenticate:

    1. Access a resource from a browser using a credential other than your Administrative credential.

    2. Verify that the session exists, as described in "Managing Active Sessions".

  2. Multiple Sessions:

    1. From a second browser (with cookies removed), access the same resource.

    2. Verify that two sessions exist.

  3. Delete all sessions, (Step 7 of "Managing Active Sessions") and confirm that the Active sessions are removed.

  4. Re-authentication Verification:

    1. From the second browser (Step 2), access a different resource to confirm that you must re-authenticate.

    2. Enter credentials for the resource.

    3. Verify that a session was created.

  5. Database Verification:

    1. Delete all sessions.

    2. Connect to the database and run the following query:

      SQL> select * from oam_session
    3. Confirm that you see the following results:

      no row selected
    4. From the second browser, access a different resource.

    5. Connect to the database and run the following query

      SQL> select * from oam_session
    6. Confirm that you see one row of data:

      1 rows selected
    7. Select rows from OAM_SESSION_ATTRIBUTES and confirm that data exists for the user.

17.7 Understanding Client-Side Session Management

Client-side (or cookie-based) session management is a light weight session management solution that reduces server-side overhead and provides better scalability. It uses client-side cookies as the persistent mechanism for SSO sessions, making the server stateless. Client-Side session management supports the following features:

  • Authentication

  • Authorization (excluding session constrains and responses)

  • OAM & OIM integration over TAP - excluding session deletion on attribute change (account lock/disable, etc.)

  • Step up authentication

  • Inactivity time out with single web domain

17.8 Using WLST To Configure Session Management

The following WLST commands can be used to configure for server-side (default) or client-side (cookie-based) session management.

17.8.1 displaySSOSessionType

Online and offline command that allows you to view the session management configuration.

17.8.1.1 Description

Allows you to view the session type configuration.

17.8.1.2 Syntax

displaySSOSessionType(domainHome="<domainHome>")
ArgumentDefinition
domainHomeSpecifies the location for the Weblogic Server OR Cell Path for WebSphere. This parameter is mandatory for WebSphere. When Offline, a value is mandatory; when online, optional.

17.8.1.3 Example

displaySSOSessionType(domainHome="/oracle/product/OAM/domains/oam_domain")

17.8.2 configSSOSessionType

Online and offline command that allows you to configure session management as COOKIE-BASED or DEFAULT.

17.8.2.1 Description

Configure session management for Access Manager.

17.8.2.2 Syntax

configSSOSessionType(type="<ssoSessionType>", cookieDomain="<cookieDomain>",domainHome="<domainHome>")
ArgumentDefinition
typeSpecifies the type of session store. Accepted values are COOKIE_BASED or DEFAULT.
cookieDomainSpecifies the value of the SSO Session Timeout cookie domain.
domainHomeSpecifies the location for the Weblogic Server OR Cell Path for WebSphere. This parameter is mandatory for WebSphere. When Offline, a value is mandatory; when online, optional.

17.8.2.3 Examples

configSSOSessionType(type="COOKIE_BASED",cookieDomain-".example.com") configSSOSessionType(type="COOKIE_BASED",cookieDomain-".example.com", domainHome="domainHome1") configSSOSessionType(type="Default",cookieDomain=".example.com")
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
, L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

Bulletin (SB19-224)

adplug -- adplugAdPlug 2.3.1 has a heap-based buffer overflow in CxadbmfPlayer::__bmf_convert_stream() in bmf.cpp.2019-08-066.8CVE-2019-14690
MISCadplug -- adplugAdPlug 2.3.1 has a heap-based buffer overflow in CdtmLoader::load() in dtm.cpp.2019-08-066.8CVE-2019-14691
MISCadplug -- adplugAdPlug 2.3.1 has a heap-based buffer overflow in CmkjPlayer::load() in mkj.cpp.2019-08-066.8CVE-2019-14692
MISCadplug -- adplugAdPlug 2.3.1 has multiple heap-based buffer overflows in CradLoader::load() in rad.cpp.2019-08-066.8CVE-2019-14733
MISCadplug -- adplugAdPlug 2.3.1 has multiple heap-based buffer overflows in CmtkLoader::load() in mtk.cpp.2019-08-066.8CVE-2019-14734
MISCbrandy_project -- brandyBrandy 1.20.1 has a stack-based buffer overflow in fileio_openout in fileio.c via crafted BASIC source code.2019-08-054.3CVE-2019-14662
MISCbrandy_project -- brandyBrandy 1.20.1 has a stack-based buffer overflow in fileio_openin in fileio.c via crafted BASIC source code.2019-08-054.3CVE-2019-14663
MISCbrandy_project -- brandyBrandy 1.20.1 has a heap-based buffer overflow in define_array in variables.c via crafted BASIC source code.2019-08-054.3CVE-2019-14665
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows file-overwrite operations during preparation for MySQL upgrades (SEC-161).2019-08-055.5CVE-2016-10768
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows an open redirect via /cgi-sys/FormMail-clone.cgi (SEC-162).2019-08-055.8CVE-2016-10769
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows arbitrary file-overwrite operations during a Roundcube update (SEC-164).2019-08-055.5CVE-2016-10770
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows file-create and file-chmod operations during ModSecurity Audit logfile processing (SEC-165).2019-08-055.5CVE-2016-10771
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows format-string injection in exception-message handling (SEC-171).2019-08-056.5CVE-2016-10773
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows attackers to discover file contents during file copy operations (SEC-185).2019-08-064.0CVE-2016-10785
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows members of the nobody group to read Apache HTTP Server SSL keys (SEC-186).2019-08-064.0CVE-2016-10786
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelThe Host Access Control feature in cPanel before 60.0.25 mishandles actionless host.deny entries (SEC-187).2019-08-065.5CVE-2016-10787
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 60.0.25 allows code execution via the cpsrvd 403 error response handler (SEC-191).2019-08-066.5CVE-2016-10789
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 58.0.4 allows code execution in the context of other user accounts through the PHP CGI handler (SEC-142).2019-08-076.5CVE-2016-10802
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 57.9999.54 allows demo accounts to execute arbitrary code via ajax_maketext_syntax_util.pl (SEC-109).2019-08-076.5CVE-2016-10805
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 57.9999.54 allows certain denial-of-service outcomes via /scripts/killpvhost (SEC-112).2019-08-074.0CVE-2016-10807
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 68.0.15 allows use of an unreserved e-mail address in DNS zone SOA records (SEC-306).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18382
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 68.0.15 writes home-directory backups to an incorrect location (SEC-309).2019-08-024.6CVE-2017-18383
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 68.0.15 allows string format injection in dovecot-xaps-plugin (SEC-318).2019-08-026.5CVE-2017-18389
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 66.0.2 allows resellers to read other accounts' domain log files (SEC-288).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18426
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelIn cPanel before 66.0.2, user and group ownership may be incorrectly set when using reassign_post_terminate_cruft (SEC-294).2019-08-024.6CVE-2017-18430
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to execute code via Encoding API calls (SEC-242).2019-08-026.5CVE-2017-18438
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to execute code via an ImageManager_dimensions API call (SEC-243).2019-08-026.5CVE-2017-18439
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo users to execute traceroute via api2 (SEC-244).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18440
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to redirect web traffic (SEC-245).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18441
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to execute Cpanel::SPFUI API commands (SEC-246).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18442
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo and suspended accounts to use SSH port forwarding (SEC-247).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18443
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to execute SSH API commands (SEC-248).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18444
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 does not enforce demo restrictions for SSL API calls (SEC-249).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18445
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows file-read and file-write operations for demo accounts via the SourceIPCheck API (SEC-250).2019-08-026.5CVE-2017-18446
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows demo accounts to execute code via the ClamScanner_getsocket API (SEC-251).2019-08-026.5CVE-2017-18447
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows certain file-read operations via a Serverinfo_manpage API call (SEC-252).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18448
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows certain file-chmod operations via /scripts/convert_roundcube_mysql2sqlite (SEC-255).2019-08-024.4CVE-2017-18450
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows attackers to read a user's crontab file during a short time interval upon a cPAddon upgrade (SEC-257).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18451
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 allows code execution via Rails configuration files (SEC-259).2019-08-024.6CVE-2017-18452
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 64.0.21 does not preserve supplemental groups across account renames (SEC-260).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18453
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelIn cPanel before 62.0.17, addon domain conversion did not require a package for resellers (SEC-208).2019-08-024.0CVE-2017-18455
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 62.0.17 allows self XSS in the WHM cPAddons showsecurity interface (SEC-217).2019-08-024.3CVE-2017-18456
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 62.0.17 allows arbitrary file-read operations via WHM /styled/ URLs (SEC-218).2019-08-024.9CVE-2017-18457
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 62.0.17 allows does not preserve security policy questions across an account rename (SEC-223).2019-08-025.0CVE-2017-18461
CONFIRM
MISCcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 62.0.17 allows demo accounts to execute code via an NVData_fetchinc API call (SEC-233).2019-08-056.5CVE-2017-18469
CONFIRMcpanel -- cpanelcPanel before 62.0.4 allows reflected XSS in reset-password interfaces (SEC-198).2019-08-054.3CVE-2017-18472
CONFIRM
MISCdlink -- dva-5592_firmwareThe web interface of the D-Link DVA-5592 20180823 is vulnerable to XSS because HTML form parameters are directly reflected.2019-08-024.3CVE-2019-6968
MISCdlink -- dva-5592_firmwareThe web interface of the D-Link DVA-5592 20180823 is vulnerable to an authentication bypass that allows an unauthenticated user to have access to sensitive information such as the Wi-Fi password and the phone number (if VoIP is in use).2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-6969
MISCfirefly-iii -- flrefly_iiiFirefly III 4.7.17.4 is vulnerable to multiple stored XSS issues due to the lack of filtration of user-supplied data in the transaction description field and the asset account name. The JavaScript code is executed during a convert transaction action.2019-08-054.3CVE-2019-14667
MISC
MISC
MISCgnucobol_project -- gnucobolGnuCOBOL 2.2 has a stack-based buffer overflow in cb_encode_program_id in cobc/typeck.c via crafted COBOL source code.2019-08-026.8CVE-2019-14541
MISCibm -- websphere_mqIBM WebSphere MQ V7.1, 7.5, IBM MQ V8, IBM MQ V9.0LTS, IBM MQ V9.1 LTS, and IBM MQ V9.1 CD are vulnerable to a denial of service attack caused by specially crafted messages. IBM X-Force ID: 160013.2019-08-054.0CVE-2019-4261
XF
CONFIRMipandao -- editor.mdpandao Editor.md 1.5.0 allows XSS via an attribute of an ABBR or SUP element.2019-08-034.3CVE-2019-14653
MISCjoomla -- joomla!In Joomla! 3.9.7 and 3.9.8, inadequate filtering allows users authorised to create custom fields to manipulate the filtering options and inject an unvalidated option. In other words, the filter attribute in subform fields allows remote code execution. This is fixed in 3.9.9.2019-08-046.5CVE-2019-14654
MISCliblouis -- liblouisA vulnerability was found in liblouis, versions 2.5.x before 2.5.4. A stack-based buffer overflow was found in findTable() in liblouis. An attacker could create a malicious file that would cause applications that use liblouis (such as Orca) to crash, or potentially execute arbitrary code when opened.2019-08-026.8CVE-2014-8184
CONFIRM
MISCmagento -- magentoA defense-in-depth check was added to mitigate inadequate session validation handling by 3rd party checkout modules. This impacts Magento 1.x prior to 1.9.4.2, Magento Commerce prior to 1.14.4.2, Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9 and Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7849
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cross-site request forgery vulnerability in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 can lead to unintended data deletion from customer pages.2019-08-025.8CVE-2019-7851
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA path disclosure vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. Requests for a specific file path could result in a redirect to the URL of the Magento admin panel, disclosing its location to potentially unauthorized parties.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7852
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn insecure direct object reference (IDOR) vulnerability in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 can lead to unauthorized disclosure of company credit history details.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7854
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cryptograhic flaw in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 could be abused by an unauthenticated user to discover an invariant used in gift card generation.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7855
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cross-site request forgery vulnerability in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 can cause unwanted items to be added to a shopper's cart due to an insufficiently robust anti-CSRF token implementation.2019-08-024.3CVE-2019-7857
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cryptographic flaw in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9 and Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 resulted in storage of sensitive information with an algorithm that is insufficiently resistant to brute force attacks.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7858
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA path traversal vulnerability in the WYSIWYG editor for Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 could result in unauthorized access to uploaded images due to insufficient access control.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7859
MISC
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cryptographically weak pseudo-rando number generator is used in multiple security relevant contexts in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7860
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoInsufficient server-side validation of user input could allow an attacker to bypass file upload restrictions in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7861
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn insecure direct object reference (IDOR) vulnerability exists in the RSS feeds of Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can lead to unauthorized access to order details.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7864
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability exists in the checkout cart item of Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This could be exploited at the time of editing or configuration.2019-08-026.8CVE-2019-7865
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA security bypass exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 that could be abused to execute arbitrary PHP code. An authenticated user can bypass security protections that prevent arbitrary PHP script upload via form data injection.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7871
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn insecure direct object reference (IDOR) vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 due to insufficient authorizations checks. This can be abused by a user with admin privileges to add users to company accounts or modify existing user details.2019-08-025.5CVE-2019-7872
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cross-site request forgery vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can result in unintended deletion of the store design schedule.2019-08-025.8CVE-2019-7873
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cross-site request forgery vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can result in unintended deletion of user roles.2019-08-024.3CVE-2019-7874
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA remote code execution vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with privileges to manipulate layouts can insert a malicious payload into the layout.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7876
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA stored cross-site scripting vulnerability exists in the admin panel of Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with privileges to manage orders can inject malicious javascript.2019-08-024.3CVE-2019-7877
MISC
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoInsufficient input validation in the config builder of the Elastic search module could lead to remote code execution in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This vulnerability could be abused by an authenticated user with the ability to configure the catalog search.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7885
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA cryptograhic flaw exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. A weak cryptograhic mechanism is used to generate the intialization vector in multiple security relevant contexts.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7886
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn information disclosure vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with privileges to create email templates could leak sensitive data via a malicious email template.2019-08-024.0CVE-2019-7888
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn injection vulnerability exists in Magento Open Source prior to 1.9.4.2, and Magento Commerce prior to 1.14.4.2, Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with marketing manipulation privileges can invoke methods that alter data of the underlying model followed by corresponding database modifications.2019-08-024.0CVE-2019-7889
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA remote code execution vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with administrator privileges to access shipment settings can execute arbitrary code via server-side request forgery.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7892
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA remote code execution vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with admin privileges to layouts can execute arbitrary code through a crafted XML layout update.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7895
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA remote code execution vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with administrator privileges to layouts can execute arbitrary code through a combination of product import, crafted csv file and XML layout update.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7896
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoSamples of disabled downloadable products are accessible in Magento Open Source prior to 1.9.4.2, and Magento Commerce prior to 1.14.4.2, Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 due to inadequate validation of user input.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7898
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoNames of disabled downloadable products could be disclosed due to inadequate validation of user input in Magento Open Source prior to 1.9.4.2, and Magento Commerce prior to 1.14.4.2, Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7899
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA remote code execution vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. An authenticated user with admin privileges to email templates can execute arbitrary code by previewing a malicious template.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7903
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoInsufficient enforcement of user access controls in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2 could enable a low-privileged user to make unauthorized environment configuration changes.2019-08-025.5CVE-2019-7904
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA server-side request forgery (SSRF) vulnerability exists in Magento Open Source prior to 1.9.4.2, and Magento Commerce prior to 1.14.4.2, Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can be exploited by an authenticated user with access to the admin panel to manipulate system configuration and execute arbitrary code.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7911
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA file upload filter bypass exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can be exploited by an authenticated user with admin privileges to edit configuration keys to remove file extension filters, potentially resulting in the malicious upload and execution of malicious files on the server.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7912
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA server-side request forgery (SSRF) vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can be exploited by an authenticated user with admin privileges to manipulate shipment methods to execute arbitrary code.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7913
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA denial-of-service vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. Under certain conditions, an unauthenticated attacker could force the Magento store's full page cache to serve a 404 page to customers.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7915
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA server-side request forgery (SSRF) vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can be exploited by authenticated user with admin privileges to manipulate shipment settings to execute arbitrary code.2019-08-026.5CVE-2019-7923
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoAn insecure direct object reference (IDOR) vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. This can be exploited by an administrator with limited privileges to delete the downloadable products folder.2019-08-025.5CVE-2019-7925
CONFIRMmagento -- magentoA denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerability exists in Magento 2.1 prior to 2.1.18, Magento 2.2 prior to 2.2.9, Magento 2.3 prior to 2.3.2. By abusing insufficient brute-forcing defenses in the token exchange protocol, an unauthenticated attacker could disrupt transactions between the Magento merchant and PayPal.2019-08-025.0CVE-2019-7928
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

Lightroom 6 may work if it was already installed before upgrading to macOS 10. 15 Catalina. liulh3Acrobath3pAcrobat 2017 is still available as a one-time purchase, but it isnt easy to find.

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What’s New in the L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number?

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System Requirements for L3 AutoLog v7.0 serial key or number

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